About your Search

20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
. hurricane sandy brings the city that never sleeps to its knees, leaving millions without power. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. wall street is working on a comeback with plans to reopen stock trading tomorrow, despite heavy flooding in lower manhattan. >> susie: from crippled transportation throughout the northeast to canceled flights, the federal response and potential election impact. we'll have all that and more right here on nbr! >> tom: hurricane sandy is now super-storm sandy as it clashes with another weather system, bringing wind, rain, and snow to parts of the mid-atlantic and northeastern u.s. she has cut a path of destruction, flooding, and massive power outages as the death toll from the storm stands at 17 across seven states. even as sandy makes her way to canada, the destruction is devastating. high winds pushed the atlantic ocean up and over seawalls, flooding entire neighborhoods. the wind and water teamed up to cut power to millions of people along the eastern seaboard. the storm surge even continued today as sandy tracked through western pennsylvania and new york state. the stor
in the program. with 50 million people in her path, hurricane sandy makes her full presence felt in the northeast. the slow moving storm has wall street closed for business, cancelled thousands of flights and shut down countless businesses. sandy's reach stretches hundreds of miles. we will talk about its potential impact on everything from economic growth to energy prices. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! as we go on the air tonight, hurricane sandy is ready to make landfall in the u.s., already it's an historic storm, with historic prparations. stock marketclosed. and coast lines evacuated with tens of millions of people sitting in the forecast path of the massive storm. sandy is a huge storm expected to come ashore in southern new jersey. but the hurricane force winds have been battering the eastern seaboard for hours. those winds extend out 175 miles from the center of the storm. those winds are pushing the atlantic ocean up and over many coast-lines. from rhode island, south to the jersey shore. coastal flooding is a significant risk thanks to the storm surge, potentially reaching 11 feet
>>> faus facing an onslaught. >> big storm coming up. >> super storm sandy lashes the northeast stopping business, travel and the presidential election campaign. people in the u.s. northeast are looking out their windows and seeing the blurry images of a storm that's headed their way. weather experts have downgraded hurricane sandy to a post tropical cycne but it' inging high winds and pelting rain to people up and down the coast. two people are missing after a ship soff of north carolina. several municipalities have declared a state of emergency. the storm is unusually large. it's expected to cut across ne jersey over thxt several hours. electricity.0 houses have lost back obama made a direct appeal to people in the hurricane's path. >> the most important message that i have for the publicight now islease listen t wt your state and local officials are saying. when they tell you to evacuate, you need to evacuate. >> 370,000 new yorkers who live close to the water have already left. city officials have shut down the transit system. businesses and shops have closed. workers are pi
the election. u.s. businesses added 171,000 jobs in october across many industries. four days after sandy, the gas crunch in jersey, access to cash in the northeast and controversy nixes sunday's running of the new york city marathon. that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more jobs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor force. the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs were created last month. that's much stronger than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the k message tre is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the lon
evening i'm susie gharib. u.s. stocks are trading again, after hurricane sandy forces an historic two-day shutdown. >> tom: wall street gets back to business, as damage and recovery estimates start to climb, plus, what it takes to restore power to millions in the northeast. >> susie: and with stocks open for trading, no surprise, home depot was the dow's standout. >> tom: lots ahead, that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: an historic day on here on wall street, after the storm of the century knocked down the financial district. us stock markets resumed operations today after two days in the dark, stocks were little changed: both the dow and the nasdaq fell 10 points, but the s&p 500 gained a fraction. trading here at the new york stock exchange opened without a hitch. the new york stock exchange opened right on time. and as new york's mayor bloomberg rang the opening bell this morning, traders were happy to be back to work. it looked like a normal day, with the buzz of activity, traders milling about. it was anything but normal no one knows that better than larry leibowitz, the
report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey and new york city here's an update: fr and a ha mlion pple are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have resumed at all of the airports in the new york area. public schools are still closed in the city, as well as many schools in new jersey. and filling up on gas is the toughest problem of all. gas stations are running dry, and others do not have electricity to pump gas. motorists lined by the hundreds in new jersey, waiting and hoping for fuel. still ahead, we have more on sandy: flood insurance, the cost of getting power turned back on, and the challenge of getting around america's busiest city. >> tom: october marked a pick-up in private hiring. that's the word from payroll processing firm adp. it says u.s. private payrolls grew by 158,000 positions in october. that higher than expected number comes as adp overhauls how it calculates the number by includi
for a powerful hit from hurricane sandy, as it barreled toward the east coast today. good eving. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we look at what state and local officials have done to prepare and examine why the storm is so large and dangerous. >> ifill: then, we turn to the presidential race, as the weather forces both candidates to cancel dozens of campaign stops. we get analysis from susan page and dan balz. >> woodruff: the political campaigns know more about you than you think. we have the first of two reports from hari sreenivasan on efforts to track voters online. >> this could be the year that digital strategies decide what is shaping up to be a razor-close election, but who is watching us and how much do they know about us? >> ifill: jeffrey brown talks with author bill ivey about his prescription for remaking america's democracy. >> well, i think what we need is to rediscover progressive values and put them forward. i'm arguing for not bigger government but i think different government. >> woodruff: and scott schaefer of public television's
. >> woodruff: the giant hybrid storm named sandy left a growing toll today. officials reported at least 39 people killed, and $20 billion or more in damage. the nation's most populous city and its surroundings were at the epicenter. new york is a city in shock today, even deserted in places after a night of fear, fire and floods. a record storm surge of 13 feet poured into parts of lower manhattan, brooklyn, and queens as sandy hit. the rush of water closed major commuter tunnels linking manhattan with otherbos contributing to the worst damage to the subway system in its 108 years. >> last night we could look down this street here and we saw the river coming toward us and it actually looked like something out of a movie. it was unbelievable. >> woodruff: equally unbelievable, winds of at least 80 miles an hour blew out the bright lights that usually dominate the manhattan skyline. some one million homes and businesses in and around the city lost power. today mayor michael bloomberg appealed for understanding amid warnings it could take days to restore all transit service and power. >> we h
update the aftermath of sandy as president obama gets a first hand look at the devastation along new jersey's shoreline. >> ifill: then, how do you plan for increasingly common super storms? ray suarez examines that as part of our series: coping with climate change. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown repos onhe btle of the grod ga, ha fought on wisconsin's turf. >> who knew? it turns out that green bay is one of the most swinging cities in the whole country, politically speaking, that is. we'll explain. >> ifill: the supreme court devoted its day to drug-sniffing dogs and privacy rights. we talk with marcia coyle of the national law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 0 years. bnf, t engine that
of the da here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: hurricane sandy tracked toward the east coast of the u.s. today after leaving at least 40 people dead across the caribbean. it battered the bahamas as a category-one storm today, knocking down trees and power lines as it went. and sandy is already stirring up strong winds and pounding surf along the florida coastline. where exactly the storm lands in the u.s. next week is still a question, but preparations for heavy rains and high winds were underway from the mid-atlantic to new england. forecasters say the hurricane could spawn a "super storm", after colliding with a cold front fm the rth and a winter storm in the west. for more, we turn to jeannette calle of accuweather.com. >> so janth heading into this weekend, what do people on the eastern see board have to be concerned about? >> sandy will continue to head northward tonight into tomorrow. an area that should be on the lookout over the next 24 hours include northeast florida to coastal georgia, including eastern sections of the carolinas. we're talking squally weather beginning later
sandy as recorded on cbs this morning. >> you hoped it wasn't going to be this bad, much of the east coast is waking up to see the full devastation of super storm sandy. we knew this was going to be a very dangerous storm and the storm has met our expectations. >> con ed says this is the single largest storm related outage in its history. >> we are very much looking for where we should put our resources. >> new york university medical center had to he advantage crate. >> when i got there and it was an extraordinary scene and the stakes could not have been higher. >> caused damage throughout the entire new jersey coast. >> half a day later it is still not over yet. we are in the midst of rescuing hundred of people and i think the east jersey shore took it in the neck, worse than any other state. >> hurricane force winds pounded ocean city maryland and they said all along their biggest worry by far is flooding. >> this is what you get on the flip side of hurricane sandy, snow. >> and it hasn't stopped all night. >> the storm has caused the cancellation of 14,000 flights across the cou
sandy and one of many questions do these hurricanes have something to do with global warming. and mao -- how do we prepare fr them in the 2350u67. joining me bryan walsh of "time" magazine, paul barrett of bloomberg businessweek and steve coll of the new yorker magazine. >> people are not able to live at sea level along these coasts like they have in the past. we have to protect it with walls. >> rose: also this evening we look at some of the responses to hurricane sandy that did work and did save lives. joining me did jon lapook medical correspondent with the cbs evening news with scott pelley. >> we like to stay away from the word miracle, we really do. that's an overused word. i will say when i got there that night, i had the feeling at the pit of my stomach at first when i walked in, i thought oh my, this isn't a movie. we don't know how this is going to end. this could end with death. the were nodeaths as far as we know of anybody or catastrophes. >> rose: finally this evening we change courses and turn to narco terrorism in mexico and talk about that with mexico's secretary o
sandy. two days have passed since the storm hit landfall late monday night. flooding and storm surge has left unprecedented damage in parts of brooklyn, queens, lower manhattan, and new jersey. at least 46 people are dead and millions are without power as a result of the storm. many new yorkers tried to return to work today but limited transit and power are expected to continue. city officials emphasize that crews are working none stop to help life return to normal. president obama joined governor chris christie earlier in the day to survey the damage to new jersey's coast. >> for those like the people i just had the chance to meet on this block and thought new jersey, throughout the region whose lives have been upended myecond message ise are he for you, and we will not forget. we will follow up to make sure that you get all the help that you need until you've rebuilt. >> what i said yesterday i really mean. there has got to be sorrow, and you see that, and the president has seen that today, in the eyes and faces of a lot of the folks he's met, and that sorrow is appropriate. we suffere
of hurricane sandy will eat into profits. the dow jones industrial average lost 139 points to close at 13,093. the nasdaq fell almost 38 points to close at 2,982. for the week, the dow and the nasdaq were off a fraction of 1%. korean auto makers hyundai and kia could end up paying hundreds of millions of dollars to car owners as compensation for overstating fuel economy. the environmental protection agency now says an audit revealed that 13 models averaged up to six miles a gallon less than advertised. some 900,000 vehicles sold in the last three years are affected. u.s. intelligence officials have rejected claims they failed to answer the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. there've been reports the cia told its security officers to "stand down" and not try to repel the attackers. senior intelligence officials denied that on thursday. they said a security team responded within 25 minutes, even though they were outmanned and outgunned. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: this was another difficult day in the aftermath of hurricane sandy.
of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other waterside ties. the massive force of the storm's destruction along the jersey shore came fully into view today. town after town presented stark scenes of wrecked homes and boats, underscoring the long process of rebuilding that lies ahead. one of those towns was the long beach community north of atlantic city, where army national guard troops arrived to assist. >> a lot of devastation. the island has been hit very hard. from what i understand there is roughly 18,000 homes without power, there is severe gas leaks, so right now we are just trying to get everything together for the office of emergency management here and the different municipalities and just assist them with whatever needs they have going on. >> brown: and even three days later, some long beach residents still could not believe the power of the storm. >> this was the deepest water i have ever seen, in my lifetime of being here. i was 11 in the '62 storm and the water ca
to the impact of superstorm sandy. dealers' attention now focused on the very important policy watch, the u.s. jobs data, which will be out on friday, as well as the u.s. presidential election next week. so a lot to watch out for. back to the studio. >> a lot to watch out for indeed, thank you very much. our business reporter at the tokyo stock exchange. >>> that's all for business news for this hour. i'll leave you with a recap of the markets. >>> u.s. president barack obama would be speaking to crowd after crowd in swing states if it hadn't been for the storm. he has less than a week to convince undecided voters. st americans have already examined his record over the past four years. he started his term with a sentiment offered by many of those who came before him. >> that america can change. our union can be perfected. >> many americans have grown tired of what their country had come to represent under george w. bush. obama promised change at home and abroad. he brought an end to the war in iraq. he said u.s. combat forces would pull out of afghanistan by the end of 2014. and he promised
york, a man in the middle of the response to hurricane sandy. >> the scope of the damage, it looked to me t reminded me of vietnam-- veeted nam, seeing areas that were bombed out,ou kw, the b-52 bombings. obviously didn't have the structures there that we have here but just wide swathe of damage. >> ialways happens in somebody else's backyard n the midwest or south. but something like this would just not anticipated and could not have been anticipated based on our history. >> rose: also this evening the last political weekend before the election on tuesday, we talk with john dickerson the political director of cbs news. >>hio is still the granddaddy of them all. governor romney's going there the most of all the battleground state, the same with the president. right now you would have to say that the president has the better electoral map, the polls in more battleground states are favouring him. but romney is doing better in north carolina and florida, and on the early vote he's doing well in those states, doing well in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with
generals, a couple of academics. but now you have people like sandy weill, the architect of citigroup. and sure, too little too late, after he made all of his money off creating these frankenstein monsters. but even he now recognizes that we have to break up the banks. you have senior officials at the federal reserve recently coming out in favor of this, the vice chair of the fdic, a very strong advocate for breaking up the banks. and you hear it a lot more in members of congress that are supporting this notion. so to me, on the one hand, it's absolutely essential. if we really want to get to the point where we don't have to bailout a bank, we have to make it so that no bank is so systemically significant and large that its failure could bring down the system. >> are they up to their old tricks? >> the banks? sure. i mean, you know, so we had this regulatory reform of dodd-frank in 2010, which, you know, left them intact and inside. but it had all of these rules and all of these regulations at needed to flow. and right now it isand ha, trch wfarecomb with those lobbyists spending all
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)